Metaphors analysis in sylvia plaths poem

Second is the number nine itself as pregnancy is typically expected to last nine months. An integral part of the bread making process, yeast is, in fact, alive. In the poem this is the catalyst for action. In line 8, Plath describes herself as being full of fruit, possibly unripe fruit.

The use of barb wire snare ratches up the tension. The father icon stretches all the way across the USA, west to east, where beauty temporarily exists in the form of bean green over blue water. Plath is uncomfortably full of her unripe fruit at this point. And I said I do, I do. In this article, I will examine Metaphors by Sylvia Plath.

And your neat mustache And your Aryan eye, bright blue. The last of four lines with end stop punctuation, suggesting a completeness.

Analysis of Poem

The word metaphor and pregnancy both have 9 letters, each line of this poem has 9 words with 9 syllables, and of course there are 9 months of pregnancy. So I never could tell where you Put your foot, your root, I never could talk to you.

It could also be that the feels used by her unborn child itself. Sylvia Plath has risked all by introducing the holocaust into the poem; only her astute use of rhythm, rhyme and lyric allows her to get away with it. The steam engine chugs on, the narrator revealing that this is no ordinary train she is on.

Gone is the comical sense of the heavy, slow moving caricatured mother, with swollen belly and thin legs. Caught between the widespread feminism of the seventies, and the family centered idealism of the s and sSylvia Plath found herself writing about many of the themes these two sides of the coin would address.

An elephant, a ponderous house, The humor continues in the second line as she continues to joke about her size. Sylvia Plath was stuck right in the middle of all this.

A Literary Analysis of the Undertones of Sylvia Plath's 'Metaphors'

She calls herself to be only a means or mode or a platform for something.Metaphors Analysis. Line One: I’m a riddle in nine syllables, In the first line of the poem, Plath sets the tone for the rest of the piece.

Playfully, the reader is informed that the speaker (Plath) is a riddle. As implied by the piece’s title, this is first of many puckish metaphors.

The poet challenges her readers to find the correct answer. Metaphors Analysis in Sylvia Plath's Poem In Sylvia Plath’s poem, Metaphors, she uses striking imagery to explore her ambivalent attitudes about pregnancy. For example, she uses a negative metaphor saying she is an elephant, meaning she thinks that she has become very fat since she got pregnant.

Feb 07,  · A year later Sylvia Plath was dead, having written some of her best poems during this turbulent period. In this article you'll find a stanza by stanza analysis of the poem, a video with Sylvia Plath reading her poem, the whole poem, and other relevant information suitable for both student and interested wine-cloth.coms: - Metaphors Analysis in Sylvia Plath's Poem In Sylvia Plath’s poem, Metaphors, she uses striking imagery to explore her ambivalent attitudes about pregnancy.

For example, she uses a negative metaphor saying she is an elephant, meaning she thinks that she has become very fat since she got pregnant. Sylvia Plath was an American poet, novelist, and short-story writer. She was the first poet to receive a Pulitzer Prize posthumously for her Collected Poems (Harper & Row, ) in 16 Responses to “Metaphors” by Sylvia Plath.

The speaker of this poem has her own take on pregnancy, and in true Sylvia Plath fashion it can come off as a little bitter. But you don't have to agree with her to enjoy the poem. But you don't have to agree with her to enjoy the poem.

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Metaphors analysis in sylvia plaths poem
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